Antonio Cantoni

MONOSTATIC ISAR SIGNAL PROCESSING REVISITED - HOW MANY WAYS ARE THERE TO SKIN A CAT?

Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) derives its name from the fact that a synthetic aperture is formed by exploiting the movement of the target with respect to radar rather than by the movement of the radar platform radar. In ISAR applications, unlike SAR, the target motion is usually not known and the target is also considered non‐cooperative. An objective of the signal processing in ISAR is to obtain a 2D or even 3D "image" of the target which represents the spatial distribution of various facets on the target that reflect electromagnetic waves when the target is illuminated by the radar. ISAR signal processing is rich in content and history.

Work in ISAR the area dates back to the late 1970. Some forty years later, the area still admits new perspectives. A recent new perspective is based on the relatively simple mathematical concept of a multidimensional Taylor series expansion of the received radar signal with minimal initial assumptions and approximations. The most common approach to ISAR signal processing up to now has involved making assumptions and approximations, at the outset, regarding the motion of the target. The talk will provide an overview of the recent work and illustrate results obtained using both simulated and real data.

Winthrop Professor, University of Western Australia